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Crossbows Tie Generations Together

 

Crossbows Tie Generations Together

by Ted Lund

 

Bud Hager had been bowhunting for nearly 50 years that cold, November morning eight years ago when he drew back on his compound bow.

“I hadn’t warmed up or stretched or anything,” says Hager. “And all of the sudden, I felt something go.”

That something was a rotator cuff.

The 70-year-old West Virginian was afraid that his life-long love affair with hunting and the outdoors was being threatened with an avocation-ending injury. After rehabilitation and healing, it was clear he was never going to be able hunt with a vertical bow again.

“Bowhunting — deer in particular — had become a real passion of mine; that all looked to be over,” says Hager, who killed his first deer with a longbow in 1967. “I started with a longbow, then made the shift to a compound bow; this was a natural progression for me to continue the pursue my passion for the sport — despite my injury.”

It wasn’t an easy process. Although the surrounding states had legalized crossbow hunting, at the time, West Virginia only allowed crossbows via a special-use license, a Class Y Disabled Crossbow Permit. (That changes at the beginning of gun season this fall; crossbows will be legally allowed for all.) Hager had to have his doctor certify his disability and also had to see an occupational therapist.

In spite of the difficulties, his payoff was bigger than he could have ever imagined. One of the biggest thrills of a life spent in the outdoors is passing down a love of the sport to future generations.

Hager started hunting with his crossbow in West Virginia and Ohio, and it didn’t take long for the next generations of Hagers to catch the bug.

Hager had been hunting with his 44-year-old son, Chad, for 36 years; his grandson Ethan, now 14, got his first bow at age 8 — before learning to hunt with a shotgun.  Once Hager shifted to the crossbow, Chad and Ethan saw it was something they wanted to — and could — enjoy with him.

“My son, Chad, and grandson, Ethan, started watching me really enjoying the crossbow, and they wanted to try it,” says Hager. “My son has killed some big deer with a crossbow and so has Ethan. It’s really brought us closer together.”

Turbo XL II

Turbo XLT II

One fall day two years ago, Hager saw that payoff come to fruition when three generations of Hagers all took big deer on his TenPoint Turbo XLT II.

“I shot a 171-inch mainframe 10, Chad killed a 164-inch mainframe 8, and Ethan (12 at the time) killed a big doe,” says Hager. “That’s something I’ll remember the rest of my life. It’s amazing how this has really brought three generations of us together and enhanced our love of the sport and the outdoors.”

To keep that interest stoked in the two younger generations, Hager made the ultimate sacrifice passing down the weapon that had changed his outlook on the sport in the face of adversity.

“I saw how much Chad and Ethan were enjoying it, so I decided to gift them my Turbo XLT II,” says Hager. “I ended

TenPoint’s new Stealth FX4

TenPoint’s new Stealth FX4

up going with TenPoint’s new Stealth FX4. Now, we don’t have to take turns.”

Hager decided to stay with the TenPoint fmaily based on what he’s seen in — and out of — the field.

“TenPoint’s quality is what impresses me the most. It’s a product that has never let me down,” says Hager. “And their customer service is second to none. They stand behind all their products and are always available to meet the needs of the customer. They go above and beyond.”

TenPoint Crossbow Technologies® is a world-class manufacturer of archery products recognized as the industry standard for safety, precision engineering, durability, performance and power. Tenpoint is committed to the care and conservation of our land, water and air;  the humane and responsible management of our wildlife; and the preservation and expansion of recreational shooting and hunting. For more information, visit www.tenpointcrossbows.com or follow them on Facebook and Youtube.

 

 

Original Source; Sportsmans Lifestyle.com

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