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Turkey Track Club Offers Some of the Best Turkey Hunting in South Dakota

 

Turkey Track Club Offers Some of the Best Turkey Hunting in South Dakota

By Amy Lignor

It is not a surprise that “Dakota” is a term used by the tribes of the Sioux nation to mean “allies” or “friends.” Because after spending just one day at Turkey Track Club, you and yours will not only find incredible hunting, comfort and scenery, but you’ll also meet up with the friendliest people imaginable.

Founded in 1974, this is one of the oldest wild turkey camps in America. Here they hunt only wild turkey – specifically the Merriam’s Wild Turkey that calls the Black Hills of South Dakota home. Turkey Track Club’s official mission is to share their passion for wild turkey hunting. On the guided hunts they offer, hunter safety and respect for the bird (by using shotguns or archery only) is emphasized. They have achieved an 87% rate on gobblers over the past ten years, but when it comes to success with guests who seek a quality turkey hunting experience, their success rate is a definite 100%.

 

What makes this an even more amazing place to spend your wild turkey hunt is the fact that your time out of the woods is as comfortable as your time in the woods is exciting. The Black Hills area is already beautiful, but the rooms at Turkey Track Club are also fully furnished and offer all the modern necessities you need for a relaxing stay while still enjoying that rustic feel. The camp, itself, is located near Keystone, South Dakota, with facilities that include the comfortable cabins as well as a central lodge for people to gather in order to swap ‘turkey hunting tales’ and enjoy great food while doing so.

 

You also cannot find a more experienced crew. Camp founders, Ron Schara and John Hauer, have been turkey hunting addicts together for more than thirty years. It is their combined enthusiasm that actually created the club.

 

Ron Schara (along with Raven, his Black Lab) is the host, producer and narrator of many TV shows, such as “Backroads” and “Legends of Rod and Reel.” He even stars in “The Outdoor Beat” on ESPN2. Co-founder John Hauer is a coveted author as well as the club’s chief guide. He has hunted game from U.S. to Africa, but still regards wild turkeys as one of his favorite game animals. And being that the Merriam’s Wild Turkey numbers well over 300,000, your prize can most always be located by the incredible guides available.

 

Providing free transportation to and from the Rapid City Airport for those hunters arriving by air, the spring turkey season in South Dakota typically opens in early April and continues into early May. (Specific camp dates may vary season to season.)

 

Upon arrival in the Black Hills, you immediately fall in love with the unique landscape of scenic vistas and endless stands of Ponderosa pines. Trout streams and lakes filled with rainbows and browns are within easy driving distance, and the historic Deadwood casinos are only thirty minutes away. Not to mention, the famous Mount Rushmore is just an hour’s drive from the camp.

 

After settling in and meeting your guide, you are off into the woods to begin scouting. You may even claim your prize that first day (the bag limit for a Black Hills turkey is one bird), and then enjoy the evening by meeting campmates, hosts, or whatever else you wish to do. When morning comes, you’re in the woods before daybreak, enjoying those moments among the pines and foothills.

 

A hunt at Turkey Track Club consists of three full days, spread over four. This includes three morning hunts and three afternoon. Midday can be spent on everything from sleeping to sight-seeing to fishing.

 

In the end, it is a given that you will return every year to hunt the hills of South Dakota, because once you’ve stayed at the Turkey Track Club, there’s no doubt you’ll make it a family tradition.

 

To learn more, get a look at those incredible views, and even book your hunt today, head to: http://www.turkeytrackclub.com.

 

Original Source: Sportsmans Lifestyle.com

 

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