Google+

The Beauty of Free Running

 

 by Troutski

This is a sport that was actually brought about by bored teenagers. Now, bored teenagers are usually thought of as the ones who sit in front of those computer screens and play some sort of killing video game. Well…can’t put the blame on teens actually, adults do this too. But there were some teens out there, back in the 1980s, who wanted to get away from the video games and turn to the Great Outdoors for a few thrills.

 

They didn’t want to fish, bicycle, or kayak. They didn’t want to jump off cliffs. What they wanted to do was utilize all these types of runlocations (mountains, lakes, boulders, cliffs, even parking lots and subway stations), to test themselves on how well they could triumph over the obstacles that the world puts in front of them. With just this idea, those teens ended up creating such an adrenaline rush that it still exists today and is considered to be an extreme sport.

 

The country was France (perhaps they didn’t have the latest in technology there in the 1980s.) Kids got together and formed a sport called Free Running, which is basically just like it sounds.

 

Running is extreme, you ask? Not a bit, no. Unless, perhaps, you’re running toward a den of hungry lions. Free running is actually an art form of sorts; running occurs when the person creates their trail through the wilds of suburbia, or the wilds of the wild. The person must utilize everything to beat the obstacles; they may have to vault over things, climb, twist, turn, and basically do acrobatics in the air without the benefit of the bicycle or motorcycle to help them out.

 

Free Running is the USA version; the French version is still referred to as Parkour. Using only the bodies and minds that the gods or God gave them, the person in the sport must find a way to run over, up, behind, etc., some pretty immovable obstacles that are in their surrounding environment.

 

The skills needed to get through these obstacles include everything from rolling to swinging, like Tarzan to swimming. An extreme sport that is not competitive is odd for some to grasp; but when the thrill-riders out there who use the ski, snowboard, or skateboard actually witness people Free Running, their jaws tend to fall open. After all, the Free Runner must make their own trail using skills, body movements, and talents that may just cause them serious pain if the obstacle wins and not them

 

Although teens thought up the concept, Frenchmen; Raymond Belle, David Belle, and Sébastien Foucan, created training methods for the sport, based on the fact that they wanted people to think. They wanted people to be able to enjoy the outdoors but work their brain to figure out how best to succeed.

 

It feels like freedom; a way for people to feel as if they are not closed in by anything or anyone. That no matter how difficult something looks or seems, they have the power to triumph over any obstacle placed in front of them by life. In other words, Free Running is a sport, an art, a philosophy, and a way for people to feel better about themselves.

 

Through interaction with the environment, and gaining triumphs over obstacles that you automatically think you can’t beat, gives humans the self-confidence they need. It also takes those critical thinking skills and enhances them. When you discuss these two particular qualities, you are discussing a duo that allows businessmen and women to become CEO’s; and also teaches children how to go above the expectations of their parents, teachers and themselves and do even greater things than they ever knew they could.

 

The reason Free Running is not competitive is the fact that fighting/challenging each other and trying to be number one is not the point of the sport. Free Running is for the person’s own mindset. It is for the participant’s health and well being, as well as physical activity – with thrills and chills thrown in for good measure.

 

In other words, there is one sport that can help both physical and mental well-being. Now THAT’s extreme!

 

,

Spread the love
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  

Google+